Why Quicken Software Should Not Be Used in a Divorce Case

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divorce financial analysisForensic accountants and Certified Divorce Financial Analysts often use Quicken personal financial software to complete the lifestyle analysis in divorce cases. Unfortunately, Quicken is not the best option for accurately and thoroughly analyzing a couple’s finances before and during divorce.

Why is it used so often? For years, Quicken was one of the better options available for compiling and analyzing personal finances. Also, since a fair number of consumers use Quicken to manage their finances, divorcing spouses sometimes provide a Quicken file to the attorney, which may be used as a starting point for the lifestyle analysis. The drawback to this is that clients don’t always keep accurate records, and the Quicken file is often incomplete or just plain wrong.

Quicken software should not be confused with QuickBooks software, which is a software package used for small business accounting. QuickBooks can be used effectively in divorce financial analysis, while Quicken is much more limited and does not produce as good a result in terms of accuracy or usability. Note, however, that even QuickBooks may not be the best option for litigation purposes. Continue reading

Written Reports in Divorce Cases

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After completing a lifestyle analysis for a divorce case, a written report is often requested. In the below video, Tracy describes the information she puts in her written reports, which often includes things like background information, documents utilized, important estimates, and methodology used.

Social Media and Other Sources of Information for Litigation

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istock_000020798140largeFifteen or twenty years ago, it may have been far-fetched to suggest that a simple internet search could help you win a case in front of a jury. Those immersed in the world of data mining knew it was possible, even then. Today, the sources of information on the internet have grown exponentially, and these can be used strategically in litigation.

The work of a financial investigator and expert witness is focused on financial documents and numeric evidence. Much of the information in fraud cases or contract litigation is found in private records, such as income tax returns, accounting records, bank statements, and financial statements.

In addition, public records can enhance a case. Traditional public records include real estate records, civil and criminal court files, probate court files, vital records, corporate registrations, intellectual property documentation, and professional licensing records.

Publicly Available Information

One source of information that is sometimes overlooked by counsel is publicly available information. The data includes everything else that is readily available to the public, if one knows where to look and how to get there. Continue reading

Finding Hidden Income in Divorce Cases

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LifestyleAnalysisInDivorceCasesSmallDo you think your spouse may be attempting to hide income or assets in your divorce? One spouse commonly has control over the money in the marriage, either by virtue of being the major breadwinner, or by controlling spending, or both. The spouse in the lesser financial position should take immediate proactive steps to protect herself or himself in the divorce. ex-spouse will have with them. By being aware of some of the most common schemes used to hide income and assets, you may be more likely to see the signs.

Some of the more common schemes used to hide money in divorces include:

  • Stashing cash – It is not uncommon for an estranged spouse to start stashing money around the house, in a safe deposit box, or with trusted friends or relatives. By not keeping the funds in a bank or brokerage account, the spouse is hoping you won’t know of the money’s existence. Pay close attention to transactions that involve cash vaporizing into thin air: large ATM withdrawals, depositing checks but receiving a large amount of cash back, the sale of assets with no paper trail or no deposit to known accounts.
  • Purchasing items that are easily overlooked or undervalued – Everyone notices a new home or a new car, but who is paying attention to works of art, valuable home furnishings, or technological toys? While some spouses are paying close attention to these types of things, many are not, and  this is one great way to reduce cash while secretly increasing hidden assets.

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