01 Feb

Kwame Kilpatrick: Lifestyle Analysis in Criminal Cases

kwame-kilpatrick-white-collar-crimeIn 2008, former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick was charged in state court with 8 felonies related to perjury, misconduct in office, and obstruction of justice. In On September 2008,he pleaded guilty to two felonies for obstruction of justice and was sentenced to four months in the Wayne County Jail and ordered to pay $1 million of restitution to the city of Detroit.

The fun didn’t stop there. Kilpatrick has been accused of hiding money that could be used to pay $855,000 restitution owed to the city of Detroit, stemming from the conviction. Despite claiming poverty and an inability to pay the restitution he owes, money has been magically appearing! Money was transferred to his wife, and Kwame  himself received $4,000 from a mystery source. None of these funds were disclosed to the state by Kilpatrick, despite being required to do so under the conditions of his probation. It is suspected that Kilpatrick has money hidden, and that is the source of the funds. Read More

09 Feb

Criminal Defense of Financial Cases

The most interesting cases I work are criminal cases for defendants accused of financial crimes such as money laundering, tax fraud, bribery and corruption, embezzlement, and investment fraud. I do my best work as a forensic accountant and fraud investigator in cases in which a trail of money must be followed through a complex web of people, entities, and bank accounts.

Peers and colleagues often question my desire to do criminal defense work. CPAs often see themselves as financial watchdogs, especially when they are providing traditional accounting or auditing services. The see themselves on the “right side” of the law, and can’t get their heads around the idea of a CPA helping a criminal. Read More

30 Nov

This Is Why I Do White Collar Criminal Defense Work

I read a very interesting article yesterday on NYTimes.com, by John Kinnucan of Broadband Research. The FBI “invited” him to wear a wire and essentially entrap clients. He said no, and he told his clients about the FBI’s request. Of course, some are skeptical about his FBI story, but it makes for interesting reading and raises some good points pertinent to my forensic accounting practice.

Some may say that if Kinnucan was innocent, he should have just worn the wire to prove he was on the up-and-up. His article explains that it wasn’t quite so simple. The FBI said they believe Kinnucan and his clients were guilty, and they threatened to arrest him immediately. Read More