Finding Hidden Income and Assets

Cases of financial fraud often focus on the core issue of where the money went. Successfully carrying out a fraud scheme involves not only taking the money, but covering up the fraud and hiding the money trail.  But skilled financial investigators know there is always a trail, and while the money may or may not be recovered, it can be located.

Cases involving allegations of security fraud, money laundering, misappropriation of assets, income tax fraud, and Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) violations require investigators to follow a money trail. However, sometimes it is difficult to know where to start, or where to continue when you’ve come to an apparent dead end.

Third Party Records

Regardless of the type of case for which there is a need to trace the flow of funds, the most reliable source of information is third party records. The records of an alleged fraudster are always suspect. How are we to know if the accounting records have been manipulated?

In contrast, records from a disinterested third party are much more likely to be authentic and to tell the truth about the money. The most common and reliable sources of third party records are banks, brokerage houses, and credit card companies. Except in rare cases in which a secret relationship facilitates the manipulation of these records, they will tell us exactly where money came from and where it went.

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Forensic Accounting Specialties

Why specialize when you’re a forensic accountant?

Forensic accounting is already a specialty within the broader field of accounting, so some people never consider that you can narrow down your practice even more. We focus on investigating numbers, but that doesn’t mean we have to do every sort of investigation out there.

I’m a firm believer that narrowing your focus helps you be better at what you do and get more (and better!) business.

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The Family Law Engagement Process

Serving as a forensic accounting expert in a family law case  begins with setting the stage for the work to be performed for the attorney.  One of the most important steps is developing the scope of the engagement. There are almost always limitations on the work based on budgets, deadlines, and available documentation. Therefore, it is important to evaluate what is available, what work is most critical and will be most valuable, and what problems the limitations might cause.

The typical divorce engagement will follow this general process:

1. Secure the engagement – Determine the nature of the engagement, the identities of the parties involved, and whether or not there are any conflicts of interest. Determine whether work can be completed in the time frame identified by the client, and whether the forensic accountant has the necessary expertise to complete the engagement.

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Why Investigate a Business During a Divorce?

Closely held businesses present special challenges in the family law setting. Typically, only one spouse is actively involved in the business. Therefore, not only does the spouse control the family’s finances, he or she also controls all of the records of the business. When a spouse is attempting to quantify the income from the business … Read more Why Investigate a Business During a Divorce?

Can Fraud Investigations Reduce Fraud?

When consumers think about investigating fraud, they do not usually think of the investigation as part of an overall plan to reduce fraud in a company. An investigation is typically seen as a reactive process that is only engaged in when a major problem is identified. Fraud investigations are representative of something completely negative, and … Read more Can Fraud Investigations Reduce Fraud?