Do Former Law Enforcement Officers Make Better Forensic Accountants?

Today Brian Willingham of the Diligentia Group has inspired me with his article Do Former Law Enforcement Officers Make Better Private Investigators? While Brian agrees that experience in law enforcement can be helpful to a private investigator, it does not necessarily make that investigator better. The same can be said for forensic accountants and fraud investigators: Law enforcement experience can be helpful, but it is not as important as you might believe.

Brian points us to a video that suggests that:

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Stopping Crystal Cox’s Harassment and Extortion

Last week Marc Randazza, his wife Jennifer, and his daughter Natalia filed suit against “investigative blogger” Crystal Cox in United States District Court in Nevada. The suit is a treasure trove of tales about a nutty blogger who fancies herself an investigator and protector of civil rights.

The backstory has been covered here before. Crystal gained her nutty notoriety because of her attacks on Kevin Padrick and Obsidian Finance. In steps Marc Randazza, noted First Amendment lawyer, who considered representing Cox in that case. After that went south, Crystal Cox started buying domain names which included the names of Randazza, his wife, and their three-year-old daughter. She  offered Randazza “reputation management services,” whereby she would refrain from posting defamatory things about him on her websites if Randazza paid her enough. That, my friends, is extortion.

The complaint summarizes:

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Crystal Cox: Still an Extortionist

Last week, an arbitration panel issued a decision in favor of Marc Randazza and Randazza legal group in a dispute with “investigative blogger” Crystal Cox. You may recall that earlier this year, Crystal Cox was up to her old tricks of defaming people on the internet, and offering them “reputation management services,” whereby for a nice sum of money she would remove the negative things she wrote about those individuals.

Cox went after Marc Randazza after becoming angry with him over his potential representation of her in another case involving extortion. The original case was noteworthy, not so much because it demonstrated Cox’s fondness for attempting to destroy reputations and then offering to repair those reputations for a large sum of money, but because the judge ruled that Crystal Cox is not a journalist. (This is not to be confused with “bloggers are not journalists,” which some people incorrectly reported after a key decision in the case. The decision was only that blogger Crystal Cox is not a journalist.)

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Right to Free Speech Wins Again

Popehat points us to a nice victory by SOCNET in a lawsuit filed by John Giduck, the man who claims he was defamed when a SOCNET user stated that he was fraudulently posing as a Special Forces veteran.

The court granted SOCNET’s motion to dismiss (even with no anti-SLAPP statute in Colorado), saying:

It is this tension that has generated numerous cases addressing the first element of a defamation action, i.e. is the statement defamatory. Not every untrue, uncomplimentary or offensive statement concerning an individual is defamatory.

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Getting Away With Bankruptcy Fraud?

Dumb and Dumber
Bankruptcy Fraudsters Jennifer McKinney and Israel McKinney

For the last several months, we have been following the story of Jennifer “MckMama” McKinney and her bankruptcy filing from nearly a year ago. By spring, trustee Gene Doeling had her number, and was preparing to file a motion objecting to the bankruptcy. In not so many words, Mr. Doeling alleged fraud against Jennifer and Israel McKinney, saying things such as manipulated, destroyed, concealed, falsified, false, and intentionally.

In my first story on the MckMama bankruptcy, I detailed the lies and deception of Jennifer Howe Sauls McKinney, both to her blog readers and to the bankruptcy court. Why such a public discussion of this case? There are two reasons. First, bankruptcy itself is a public process. The documents are readily available on Pacer, the federal government’s online warehouse of court documents.

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