Isagenix Scam: Questionable Medical Claims, No Science Behind Them

Multi-level marketing company Isagenix offers a cleansing product which it claims helps people lose weight. Is this MLM scheme offering a bogus product, or is this a legitimate weight loss program?

Let’s start off by clarifying that in general, multilevel marketing companies are legal scams in the United States. The government allows them to exist and multiply. They offer products which are little more than a “front” for the schemes, since without a legitimate looking product or service, the companies would be at risk of appearing to be illegal pyramid schemes.

In this article, we are not focusing on the MLM method of selling an opportunity or product. We are looking at the product itself.  Isagenix has its roots in colon cleansing products. These are detoxification products which they claim help people lose weight. The company also offers vitamins, supplements, and anti-aging products for the skin.

Does detox work to help lose weight? Is it something healthy that people should be doing regularly? The Mayo Clinic says that detox diets have no proven scientific benefits. Our bodies naturally remove toxins from things we ingest, and there is no need to add some sort of cleansing products to our diets to remove toxins.

Dr. Harriet Hall writes more below about the junk science behind Isagenix. In short, there are no proven benefits to using the Isagenix products. Users of the products may offer anecdotes about their success with them, but that is not the same as having independent scientific studies supporting such claims. Of course, Isagenix prohibits reps from making medical claims about the products, but such a prohibition never seems to stop the distributors in any company.

 

Critique of Isagenix

by Harriet Hall, M.D.

A friend inquired about a product, Isagenix (actually a whole family of products) that is being pushed by the leader of her weight loss group, claiming that “The Isagenix cleanse is unique because it not only removes impurities at the cellular level, it builds the body up with incredible nutrition. Besides detoxing the body, Isagenix teaches people a wonderful lesson that they don’t need to eat as much as they are accustom to and eating healthy choices are really important and also a lot of the food we are eating is nutritionally bankrupt.”

I went through the website (http://www.isagenix.com/) and watched the promotional videos. There is so much to criticize that I hardly know where to start. It’s all misinformation, unsupported claims, testimonials, and money-making ploys.

I couldn’t find a critique of Isagenix on the Web, but that’s not surprising. No serious medical scientist would take it seriously enough to bother about it. And it’s basically all been done before; it’s just a slightly new wrinkle on an old scam. You will find some information on related products at: http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/detox.html

You can also go to the quackwatch.org homepage and type in cleansing or type in detoxification.

The claims on the Isagenix website are a mishmash of pseudoscience, myth, misrepresentation, and outright lies. For example:

  • Americans are sicker than ever before.
  • Toxicity accounts for most diseases.
  • The body protects itself from toxins by coating them with fat, causing obesity. [The truth: some toxins are soluble in fat and can be taken into existing fat cells, but no new fat cells are created.]
  • The internal organs become clogged and deteriorate if you don’t cleanse.
  • Nutrients that cleanse, revitalize, rejuvenate — what does this even mean?
  • The human body needs cleansing like air conditioners that need their filters changed and car engines that need oil changes. [This is nonsense: the human body cannot be compared to a machine: it is a living, self-regulating organism that does its own maintenance.]

They engage in scare-mongering about toxins, but provide no data to show that the tiny amounts we ingest lead to any significant adverse health effects. They also provide no evidence that their treatment actually removes any toxins from the body. Or that doing so would have any significant impact on health. There have been no properly controlled scientific studies of their “cleansing” treatments, only testimonials of the sort that abound on the Internet for hundreds of other ineffective products.

There is absolutely no rationale for the particular combination of ingredients in their products. They have LOTS of different products, and have included just about every nutrient and herbal remedy in existence: 242 of them! Some of these we know to be useless, some are potentially harmful, and we have no idea how the particular ingredients in the mixtures might interact for better or for worse.

They offer “ionic” minerals from “ancient plant deposits.” Minerals are the same thing wherever they come from, and all “ionic” means is that it is in a form that can be absorbed — i.e. magnesium as milk of magnesia rather than as a lump of elemental magnesium metal.

They advertise “no caffeine added” for a product that contains green tea; green tea contains caffeine. They repeat the tired old myth that our food isn’t as nutritious as in the “good old days.” They put digestive enzymes in their products to help you assimilate them, not realizing that orally ingested digestive enzymes are themselves digested in the stomach before they can do anything. They say that their electrolytes “ignite the body’s electrical system” — I have no idea what this means, and it certainly is not scientific terminology.

Their antioxidant mixture contains 15,000 IU of vitamin A as beta carotene plus 5000 IU as palmitate. The Medical Letter recently reviewed vitamin A and warned that no one should take high-dose beta carotene supplements, and that women should not take vitamin A supplements at all during pregnancy or after menopause. Among other things, they said: Vitamin A may also have pro-oxidant effects in vivo. A high intake of vitamin A from supplements and food has been associated with an increased risk of hip fracture in postmenopausal women and with teratogenicity when taken during early pregnancy. A placebo-controlled intervention trial in Finnish smokers found that 20 mg/day of a beta carotene supplement increased the incidence of lung cancer by 18%, which was statistically significant. Another large double blind intervention trial in smokers and asbestos exposed workers, terminated early because no benefit was demonstrated, found that combined therapy with 30 mg of beta carotene and 25,000 IU of vitamin A daily was associated with an increase in the incidence of lung cancer, cardiovascular mortality and total mortality.

The Medical Letter concluded: “A balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables may be safer than taking vitamin supplements. No biologically active substance taken for a long term can be assumed to be free of risk.”

Isagenix claims to promote weight loss. All “treatments” for [temporary] weight loss work the same way: they get people to ingest fewer calories than they expend. There is no reason to think that a person who restricts calorie intake and exercises will lose any more weight if they add Isagenix products. Diuretic and laxative effects, psychological factors, and enthusiasm for a new method may initially fool people into thinking they have benefited.

Their medical advisor, Becky Natrajan, MD, tells us on a video presentation that she is “excited about results” but she does not say what those results are or why she thinks the results are due to the product rather than to diet, exercise and other factors. Perhaps her funniest argument is that the $5 a day Isagenix costs you is less expensive than open heart surgery. As if it were a simple choice between the two!

She tells you to contact the person who told you about Isagenix. And one of the headings on the website is “Wealth.” There you will find out how you can sell products from your home and become an associate, a consultant or an executive with increasing levels of financial return. This sounds like a typical multilevel marketing scheme, typical of products that can’t be marketed effectively based purely on their merits.

In short, Isagenix is a slick marketing enterprise that lines the promoters’ pockets by selling baseless hope. There is a disclaimer on the website that should be taken very seriously: “These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.”

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65 Comments

  • Grateful Consumer says:
    5 October 2011

    Thank you so much for this! I tried googling 4 different ways to get the actual ingredients and an objective analysis of whether some new evidence showed anything in a supplement could “burn fat” and all I got was pages of links from the company & salespeople–even when I included the word scam–they are very clever in anticipating this charge–until I found you.
    I have read some of Dr. Hall before, but hesitated to send friends the link bc the original website would be kind of overwhelming if not threatening to friends who have heard over & over or just accept alternate myths about energy, thought changing water crystals, etc. as passed on by so many yoga teachers & self-claimed healers as well as pop media. In this format I will be able to share.
    I had gone to her FB page to learn about an Ashtanga yoga teacher I was thinking about taking class with, and she was gushingly claiming she’d effortlessly lost 9 pounds & had more energy with Isagenix, which I’d never heard of. The post’s tone suggested a marketing scheme, and also suggested a lack of basic human physiology knowledge which seems to be alarmingly common in the health industry. Trainers & yoga teachers seem to memorize anatomy but not understand the functions of body organs as scientifically proven. Increasingly I’m realizing what i thought were metaphors are actually their beliefs. Not so sure I want to take her guidance in how to work my body in the rather strenuous practice of Ashtanga. Thanks!

  • Bob Brower says:
    7 October 2011

    This isn’t the only company that uses this tactic. Beachbody (maker of some great workout DVDs) is an MLM that sells a product called Shakeology in addition to the workout programs. The vast majority of Shakeology customers are also sales affiliates (or “coaches” as they call them). The shake costs $115 A MONTH(a little less if you are a coach), and the claims that these coaches make are ridiculous, unfounded, and irresponsible. They claim that Shakeology cured their IBS, helps them manage their diabetes, got them off a whole slew of medications, etc. (look at their Facebook page for a small sampling). If you say $115 a month is too expensive, they’ll tell you that a) it’s NOT expensive when you consider people spend that much on Starbucks, and b) well, you save $30 if you sign up as a coach under me. I was intrigued, so I figured I would do some research. EVERY page that I came across about Shakeology was written by a Beachbody Coach. If you type in “Shakeology scam,” you are directed to a site with an article that explains why Shakeology is NOT a scam. Type in “Shakeology pyramid”, “shakeology sucks”, you get articles written by Beachbody coaches saying why Shakeology is NOT those things. You need to be careful with these MLMs. They have a way of brainwashing their sales people

  • Isagenix Skeptic says:
    26 November 2011

    Thank you for operating one of the rare blogs, like mine also, that take the less profitable side of the MLM / Nutritional Scam sector.

    We could be out forcing our relatives to pay thousands of dollars for dangerous products…but it would not be the right thing to do.

    Happy Thanksgiving Weekend,

    IS

  • Meghan says:
    6 December 2011

    I’ve never done the cleanse, but was thinking about doing so after the holidays. I’m no medical expert, but I am entering into health care as a nurse in the near future and nutrition fascinates me. The hypothesis that neurological syndromes and food allergies are attributed to toxicity *has* been supported by research (see Dr. Theo Colhoun’s work). Differences have been shown between subjects who ingest foods laden with additives and pesticides in contrast with with subjects who eat whole, organic foods. The effects of taking in said toxins can range anywhere from developmentally delayed children to reproductively impaired adults. These statements have been supported by data and research.
    I recently read about the various P450 enzymes and their role in detoxifying our bodies…Could pesticides and additives have an adverse effect on these enzymes? I would love to see the research, but my instincts after reading more into the subject say perhaps. The question pertaining to this post concerning Isagenix supporting proper detoxification or not isn’t my point. My point is that the “old school” thinking of nutrition in the light of “every calorie is the same” needs to be thrown out. Isagenix at least supports people in making healthier choices…Kale instead of candy perhaps. You are what you eat, and heck, if Isagenix gets people to drink a nutritional shake vs eating a happy meal, I’m all for it.

  • Joe Hallett says:
    9 February 2012

    Thank you. Keep up the good work you are doing! Critical thinking is lacking in our society. PLEASE people of the world…pull your head out of the sand and do a little research before trusting a company that wont provide clinical evidence thats its products are safe… or even works for that matter. (unless you believe that putting your head in the sand prevents solar radiation from melting your brain)

  • david dan says:
    22 February 2012

    thank you for the ubiased review of beachbody. i tried the shake at the recommendation of a friend. the problem is, there are many people recommending this product as part of their “multi-level marketing business”. these people are not doctors, but are true believers pushing a product which i believe could have bad side effects for some people. this product really messed with/trashed my system.
    the company is very smart by implementing the multi-level marketing because all of these “so called” internet doctors drain out reason throughout the internet.
    the coaches at beachbody are pushed to recruit other coaches and push this meal replacement shake.

  • Michele says:
    19 April 2012

    My only question is for more information on this statement: “Some of these we know to be useless, some are potentially harmful…”
    Besides the vitamin A you mention, to which other ingredients would you be referring as potentially harmful?

  • Doc Bunkum says:
    20 April 2012

    I see that Isagenix medical advisor, Becky Natrajan, MD, may be “excited about the results”, – but not that excited.

    Apparently she’s bailed ship and found a new home at TriVita.

    “At last, after 12 months of extensive research looking for the “perfect” wellness company and Affiliate opportunity…

    Dr. Becky and Dan Maes have joined forces with TriVita to bring Wellness to the World”!

    “Renowned Medical Doctor and award-winning Marketing Executive have teamed up to bring wellness to the world by harnessing the power of a proven Affiliate opportunity of a lifetime! Dr. Becky Maes (formerly Natrajan) and Dan Maes have embraced TriVita’s mission, superior quality products and proven business model. They are 100% dedicated to your success and helping you experience wellness and create wealth for your life purposes.”

    Same old, same old. Geez…you need a score card to keep track of which “next best greatest opportunity of the month” these professional jumpers are currently working.

  • Chuck U. Farley says:
    11 January 2013

    Meghan is an Isagenix rep. Even Stevie Wonder can see that.

  • Isagenix and Herbalife Skeptic says:
    16 January 2013

    I could not agree more Chuck. In general, MLM acolytes fan out accross the web to bury the important but negative truth about risks, waste, and other negative impacts with astroturf posts that that one…

  • Isagenix Scam Evangelist says:
    25 January 2013

    No comment from Megan as she moves on to other more receptive sites on which to continue the propaganda crusade. I’m glad sites like this are among a few that do come up in search results with accurate information about these scams. Thank you Tracy, you are on the side of angels ;-)

  • DrJonesy says:
    28 January 2013

    I sold Isagenix for a while and had tons of people under me selling it. I was about to receive my first commision check for a huge amount of sales, and I was fired from Isagenix. I had sold one Cleanse kit on eBay, and was told after the fact, that it was not allowed. It had never been stated that ebay was frowned upon. I think the product is not harmful to use, but I also believe that it doesn’t do any good either. Out of the hundreds of sales I had, not a single person ever told me they felt healthier. I actually feel guilty now for selling it to people I cared about.

  • Isagenix Scam Info says:
    29 January 2013

    @DrJonesy — thank you so much for your candor and perspective. I sense that is the experience many people have with Isagenix and other products. There isn’t a lot of proof they work, aside from a possible placebo effect which likely wears off. There is a risk they may in fact be bad for health. But the one thing we know for sure is that when you are selling a product via MLM, it tend to be overpriced, and it tends to be sold to people you care about, who buy it because they are about you and trust you. Thank you again for your story.

  • D says:
    31 January 2013

    I have been living with two people who sell it, for the past 3 months. One of them eats pizza all of the time (2-3 times a week) and he also takes a lot of prescription drugs, ie. Ambien, anti-anxiety meds and others, the product does not seem to help him, obviously. The other sells it full-time and his motivation seems to be money and becoming on of the ‘millionaires’, you know, like the good ‘ole Amway days, remember the ‘millionaires’. He doesn’t seem to care that much about the actual product, except he works night and day on his sales ability and is quite aggressive in convincing people of one thing or another.

    I think a emotional cleanse (therapy) or nice spa vacation would have much better results, and probably cheaper in the long run.

  • Islander says:
    19 February 2013

    I am an Isagenix user, but I’ve refused to get involved in the MLM scheme. The program seemed to work well for me – I lost over 20 pounds over about a month, with actually increased energy, better mental acuity and little to no problems with hunger, save for the actual cleanse days (when you eat nothing but the tiny snacks and cleanse tonic).

    But the products are expensive. I suspect too expensive, given that I can get protein shakes and similar “metabolism boosting” supplements at my local SuperSupplements store. My coach tells me that the difference in price is due to the “trace minerals” and the fact that the whey protein comes from fully organically raised cows in New Zealand. That sounds a bit fanciful to me, but I can’t ignore the fact that the system appears to work for me.

    Now my coach wants me to try Product B. I’ve done enough research on stress and the mind to believe that nutrition is an important part, but *man* that stuff is beyond spendy – $77 bucks for a roughly one-month supply.

    Added with the shakes, snacks and cleanse tonic and it’s easily $300-400 or more each month. I’m all about investing in my health, and I have to agree that spending $10 bucks a day on healthy supplements is better than Starbucks and McDonalds, but I have to imagine there is a more affordable way.

    So, I believe in the system, but I’m looking for a more affordable way. Has anybody transitioned OFF of Isagenix, but continued a similar system using more affordable products?

  • Tracy Coenen says:
    19 February 2013

    Why not put that extra $10 a day toward nutritious foods, instead of some crappy supplements? Eat more fresh fruits and vegetables. That’s certainly a lot better for you than meal replacement nonsense.

  • Jen says:
    19 February 2013

    “I have to agree that spending $10 bucks a day on healthy supplements is better than Starbucks and McDonalds, but I have to imagine there is a more affordable way.”

    Yeah, it’s called Not Spending Ten Bucks Per Day at Starbucks or McDonald’s. It is obviously healthier for both you AND your wallet. No need to feel like you have to substitute the coffee/junkfood for overpriced MLM crap in order to feel better.

  • Shaun says:
    27 February 2013

    Those are all gimmicks and tricks. It’s a big business and obviously people are looking for the next big miracle or “easy” way to be healthy. It all goes back to having a nutritious diet and regular exercise. THAT’S IT!

    1. If your goal is to lose weight, cut back on calories and exercise.

    2. If your goal is to lower blood pressure, cut back on sodium and exercise.

    3. If your goal is to lower cholesterol, cut back on saturated/trans fats and exercise.

    4. If your goal is to lower your blood sugar, cut back on carbs/sugar and exercise.

    5. If your goal is all of the above, eat more fiber and exercise.

    6. If your goal is to lower risk of heart disease (or just to be healthy overall):

    a) Don’t smoke

    b) Exercise daily

    c) Maintain a healthy weight

    d) Cut back on fat, sodium (see 2 and 3)

    e) Eat more veggies/beans, fruits, whole grains and low fat dairy

    People know this, they just need to do it and make it part of their lifestyle.

    Obviously there are people who have medical conditions or strong family history where medication is needed. But the magic bullet as far as weight loss is concerned is calories in, calories out.

  • Marcy says:
    18 July 2013

    Isagenix is all hype! Just eat “clean” foods; organic, non-processed fruits vegetable, whole grains (quinoa, brown rice, etc.)! Yes, the product has nutrients, but there is an absence of research studies. The only studies conducted are those by Isagenix, which is no good. If results are not replicated then how do we know something is really working, and not due to chance. Eat less calories by cutting out processed foods, and enjoy what mother nature gave to us :)..a perspective from a molecular biologist.

  • Smiley says:
    18 November 2013

    I have been looking for negative feedback on Isagenix and am having a hard time finding anything. So glad to find your blog! What gets me is the people that are selling this product..and I have several on my FB page, claim not only can you lose weight, but selling the product has made them incredibly rich! Buying Ferarri’s, huge homes, fishing boats and flying on their ‘private planes’ to speak about the product. Come on already!!!!

  • Tracy Coenen says:
    18 November 2013

    Please understand that MLMs and their reps try really, really hard to ensure that you can’t find anything negative about them. They flood the internet with propaganda, and some even sue people who post negative things.

  • ItsJustMe says:
    2 December 2013

    I was connected to several people on FB that sell this product. They are all claiming the same ‘wealth’ that Isagenix has brought them. One girl claims she has purchased several expensive sports cars, fly’s in a private jet and has an expensive home (posting pictures to prove it). She also claims to be one of the top selling reps, yet her name is nowhere on the Isagenix website. Her pictures appear on other peoples pages as well. Her profile picture has changed from an older blonde woman to a young brunette. Sounds like a fraud to me. This is why I’ve started looking into this product. How can you trust it?

  • fee says:
    9 February 2014

    so glad to see this feed back, here in Australia I am confused at times , I seem to be the only one that does not want to try Isagenix, I am a therapist and I have clients telling me all these great stories how Product B saved lives , from cancer to skin conditions , and it stops you aging with the telomeres , it cost $100 for 100 capsules , it last a month at 4 capsules a day , and yes these people win trips to overseas all the time , and bring a income of $2000 a week from sales , sounds good , hey , .

  • Mrs Biggs says:
    6 March 2014

    I too am also glad to have come across this website. I have not been able to find any information on this product from my own independant research that wasn’t posted on a Facebook page somewhere.
    A colleague was telling me about the product who has lost quite a bit of weight. She says she feels amazing… How could I not want to know more? But, I am cynical by nature and wanted to know more. I guess the things I was wondering were; if this product is so great, why is it only available via MLM methods? Wouldn’t it be available everywhere for everyone, rather than kept quiet? Something just didn’t add up, and I wonder if in fact the colleague is being conned? The more I look, the less I like what I see, almost like a pack mentality from the people involved?

  • Louise says:
    15 March 2014

    Many Thanks for this thread. I to have been searching for (hopefully) unbiased information and am glad I stumbled on this. I guess it’s that age old quote “if it sounds too good to be true…….”

  • Gorgeouswoman says:
    27 March 2014

    Well said. I have used Isagenix in the past and it is good for a quick weight loss because you cut calories, cleanse days you eat nothing, so yes you lose weight. But it all comes back. I am now finally learning about proper nutrition and exercise, especially cutting sodium and keeping stress levels down. My next move now is to take up yoga which I heard has great stress relieving benefits.

  • Keith Davies says:
    14 May 2014

    Calories in v Calories out, exercise etc etc, these are all the common sense answers to any attempt to lose weight. If you take Isagenix or any other product to SUPPLEMENT your lifestyle then you are more likely to achieve success, so if you look at Isagenix or other SUPPLEMENTS in this context then they will help. Maybe use them as a jumpstart to help you improve other lifestyle habits like the fruit and veggies and exercise. I have never tried this stuff but over the years as a Professional Athlete I have tried many, but they have never been the hook on which I hang my nutritional requirement hat….

  • Not LeeAnn Werner Jackson says:
    27 May 2014

    So happy to see people finally hearing the truth about these products. I have been with Isagenix for 13 years and am tired of the scam being run on customers. The products are no better than typical vitamins that can be bought at Target or Walmart. Further, the claims of financial freedom are completely overblown. Almost no one makes money in Isagenix!

    I am happy to finally have a chance to come clean, and I am glad that this blogger is speaking the truth. Don’t be fooled: the values of integrity and quality are sorely lacking in this company. The “clinical research” that is touted by the company and the reps is nothing more than researchers being paid by Isagenix to come to certain conclusions. Please spread the word!

  • Scott says:
    27 May 2014

    Me thinks someone has misappropriated LeeAnn’s name for those comments… just google her…. :)

  • Dave says:
    28 May 2014

    I doubt you were with Isagenix for 13 years it took you that long to figure out it was a scam? Lol sounds a little weird to me, I can vouch for this product it does work they are great products and yes we are making money and know others that are also making a lot more, obviously your not very informed about this company or you just failed miserably and is just bitter.

  • Scott says:
    1 June 2014

    It is a little sad that doctors prescribe drugs that mask symptoms and not more nutrition as a whole. I have to agree with the “air filter” analogy. We have so much junk food out there with ingredients that are engineered and not necessary and very toxic to our system, yet the FDA does nothing about them. If you look at evolution, non of these ingredients were around until chemists came up with them so we did not “evolve” to process these things. That is where I think we are toxic. Stuff like Red Bull and similar drinks are lauded for the “lifestyle” of all things daredevil, yet nobody talks against it being an incredibly toxic drink along with most other energy drinks. Doritos are still produced with MSG!!! yet nobody says anything about that, which is beyond frightening. So for me, if all the ingredients are natural I think there are other things we should be more focused on. I have tried Isagenix and for me I used it every day for Breakfast and a snack (bar form) at lunch. It helped me to be aware of what I put into my body, so now for me if it didnt come out of the ground then it is not natural is how I eat now. So for that reason I am glad I did the Isagenix. I was looking for nutrition and got an education on awareness of my health so in the end it was a good thing for me.

  • Angie says:
    22 June 2014

    Isagenix was started in 2002. Do the math

  • Dave says:
    24 June 2014

    Lol yeah really lol. Willing to bet this person never sold or even tried the product

  • Morgan says:
    10 July 2014

    I wish had something that cleaned toxins out of my body. Oh wait. I do. It’s called a LIVER.

  • Scott says:
    10 July 2014

    you are so correct Morgan! Which was great 100 years ago — but now it’s overloaded — kinda like taking your household trash and tossing it in the garage — house is great now, but eventually that garage is going to be a problem… :) My car and house have filters in them too…. love your liver!

  • AgeLessPat says:
    18 July 2014

    Please tell me that “common sense” is still alive and kicking! Wow! I have subscriptions to nutrient newsletters, health newsletters, books on “superfoods”, cross-referenced (personal research) not only Product B (where does the name come from?), but have tried to investigate what the “vital herbal nutrients” are that ‘guarantee’ a complete health overhaul–at the cellular level ?! Really? Why sren’t these products available to the (general) public? I trust my personal care physician’s advice…and his advice? Too much of a (good or bad) thing is a waste!!

  • mirna says:
    29 July 2014

    I just started this program. And good to expensive. . I honestly think of going back to my eating Clean and organic shopping at sprouts or wholes food its cheaper then this… I said eat clean organic and lets stop giving our money away to this people. Nothing like eating un package products … :) good luck

  • Annette says:
    29 July 2014

    Scott…..so are you trying to say that our livers are not cleaning out the toxins in our bodies anymore?? Seriuosly? Instead of just telling us your analogies, why don’t you give us scientific proof that the liver doesn’t clean out our toxins like it did 100 years ago!! That is the most crazy thing I’ve heard in a long time. Our livers work great, especially eating healthy foods. Not eating anything and then drinking some magic shake doesn’t make your liver work better! Comparing our bodies to taking the trash only to the garage is laughable. And I’m sure you are laughing all the way to the bank!!! That is if you have made it that far up the pyramid!! If not just keep spilling the nonsense to gullible people and you MIGHT just make it!!

  • Chris says:
    30 July 2014

    Is selling Isagenix at a flea market allowed by the company???

  • Kay says:
    17 August 2014

    Your “coach” is acting unethically by promoting these products

  • Roger says:
    19 August 2014

    I am on day 8 of a 30 Day Isagenix “cleanse” …. it seems to be having some effect , but I’m not sure if I’ll continue after … I hate the feeling of being hungry all the time .
    I’m not sure if not eating for 2 days on a double cleanse is actually good for you … lol …
    I think as a ” kick in the ass ” toward better living it might be ok , but for me not sustainable .
    I’d rather eat healthe real food and do more exercise …
    Completely not interested in the MLM side of things .

  • Tracy Coenen says:
    22 August 2014

    No, not eating for 2 days is NOT good for you. We are supposed to eat. It’s about what you eat… and you should eat FOOD, not these bullshit shakes and pills.

  • Paul says:
    13 September 2014

    Bottom line if you want something to happen for yourself you can do it, you can make it work without all these products. Eat clean, exercise, include a good protein shake from vitamin shop, add a vitamin or two and be determined to exercise with a good program. Have a plan, be a leader don’t have someone feed you like a baby. Don’t forget come up with a meal plan. Do your own research and save big bucks by keeping money in your pocket and not these huge multi marketing companies who want nothing more then your wallet.

  • Dani says:
    26 October 2014

    I wish people would open their eyes a bit and spend more time criticizing and ripping apart the REAL scammers in our world, like Big Pharma whose job it is to keep us sicker than ever and not a product or company that promotes and believes in REAL solutions for a healthy body, whatever the company may be. If any of you actually believe that our bodies can naturally defend themselves against all of the toxins and pollution that is bombarded on us WITHOUT our consent, then good luck to you…you will need it. Start fighting against those making you ill….NOT those trying to at least help! And btw…this lady’s job is to pick apart anything she gets her hands on….open your eyes!

  • Pepper Culpepper says:
    31 October 2014

    While Isagenix, MonaVie and Beach Body are all MLM scams with outrageous claims, done of what you say is completely false. The human body cannot detoxify itself if someone is eating packaged, processed food loaded with sugar, MSG and other chemicals on a daily basis. The body CAN detoxify itself through intermittent dating and by adding whole, organic foods such as complex carbs, vegetables, a little fruit and lots of H20.

  • Pepper Culpepper says:
    31 October 2014

    I also wanted to add that medical doctors know very little about nutrition since they only get 1-3 hours in med school. I’d go to an M.D. for Burton advice like i would go to the Cable company to fix my plumbing.

  • Pepper Culpepper says:
    31 October 2014

    *fasting, not dating
    *nutrition, not Burton
    and
    *some, not done

    My phone is acting crazy today!

  • Pepper Culpepper says:
    31 October 2014

    To the people arguing about the liver. Are you unaware of this pesky thing alcoholics get called cirrhosis? The same thing can gain to non-alcoholics if they consume a lot of.sugar and junk foods. Our livers only work when we eat healthy, whole food. Do you honestly think the people who live on fast food and are over 30% BF actually have healthy livers? Seriously?

  • Lisa says:
    2 November 2014

    Gosh this is quite an eye opener! I was talked into doing Isagenix purely because I wanted to shift some weight. I have been on the programme now for 4 days and have lost 1kg already but have not felt good on it at all. Headaches, Nausea, light headedness, and just downright hungry! My Diet before has always been healthy just sometimes have too much of it. My husband says that you loose weight because “you aren’t eating” and yet my Isagenix coach says that everything I need is in the “shake”! To feel lousy on such a product makes me think it can’t possibly be healthy for you in the long run. So all I can say is I have paid for it now so will continue for the 30 day programme but will cancel my Auto ship as the Product is too darn expensive to be on it continuously and I enjoy eating good wholesome food without suffering through just drinking plain old shakes that obviously, from reading the above, don’t work!

  • Dave says:
    3 November 2014

    Either you are getting bad advice from your coach or you are not doing the program correctly, my wife and I have been on Isagenix for over 2 years have lost weight and have never been healthier, there is no reason why you should be hungry you can do your shakes plus your meals make sure taking in enough calories, if your not happy you send your products back and you will get your money back they offer a great money back guarantee. Most that fail on this program either have bad coaching or are not being honest with themselfs and are not doing the program correctly

  • Tracy Coenen says:
    3 November 2014

    Lisa – Don’t let anyone fool you. The Isagenix products are NOT healthy. We are meant to eat nutritious food, and supplement that as necessary. We are NOT meant to ingest shakes full of sugar and nonsense in place of food. Send the crap back and get your money back!

  • Cameron says:
    3 November 2014

    Full of sugar? What shake are you describing? What about the skake is not healthy? What nonsense are you refering to? Back your claims please, or refrain from commenting, even if it is your blog. It is one thing to desparage the business model, it is another to make claims that you are not qualified to make.

  • Tracy Coenen says:
    4 November 2014

    Yes, Cameron… full of sugar. From the label of the product, the second ingredient is fructose (sugar). LOL. It appears that I am QUITE qualified to make that claim.

    http://www.isagenix.com/~/media/product/isalean-shake/isalean-shake-fact-panels/us-en-fact-panel-isalean-shake-can-creamy-french-vanilla.pdf

  • Dave says:
    4 November 2014

    Fructose is in the fruit we eat you would have to ingest a rediculios amount for it to be harmful.

  • Tracy Coenen says:
    4 November 2014

    Fructose is sugar, moron. You criticized me for saying that the Isagenix shakes were full of sugar. I responded with the ingredients lists, which shows sugar as the second ingredient…. i.e. the shakes are full of sugar. I didn’t say it was harmful. it’s just not nutritious and the shakes are SHIT that you shouldn’t be using as meal replacements.

  • Jennie says:
    8 November 2014

    Currently experiencing major health issues after only 2 months of using Isagenix products. I’ve heard very similar stories after digging a little deeper. Class action lawsuit sounds about right. I’m really disappointed in myself for not having done better research before using these products.

  • John says:
    10 November 2014

    I would like to see some proof on this allegation, I’ve been using this product for 3 years and lead a very healthy life, I also know close to 20 people doing the same product with great results. Be careful what you say. I’m not convinced what so ever on your claims

  • Tracy Coenen says:
    10 November 2014

    John – She doesn’t owe you any proof. She shared her experience with the product. Take or leave her comments.

  • Dave says:
    10 November 2014

    It’s obvious a lot of these comments are just people with no knowledge about the product in question and putting negative information out about it.

  • Chel says:
    10 November 2014

    interestding that making negative claims is taken at face value, but making positive claims is assumed questionable (or bogus). As a professional fraud investigator, one would assume that (unless biased), your investigative impulse would go both ways….

  • Tracy Coenen says:
    10 November 2014

    Chel – I don’t have an opinion one way or another about whether Jennie is telling the truth. The issue is that she doesn’t owe any explanation or any proof to you Isagenix shills.

  • Lisa says:
    22 November 2014

    Dave in reply to your comment “those that Fail aren’t doing the programme properly” let me assure you I am INDEED doing it correctly! I am nearly at the end of my 30 day cleanse and have only lost 3.5kgs and 15cms I have followed it to a T and all I can say is good for you if you and your wife find this product great. I have also found that those that are “Big” to start with on this programme generally loose a lot quite quickly and it cant be a healthy way to loose. Exercise and wholesome food can generally shift the weight if one sticks to that. I just wanted a helping hand and can say that it wasn’t an enjoyable one! And……Tracy, you are definitely right about the sugar! Do people not know that Sugar is reported as being a Killer? Does not take a rocket scientist to see that!

  • Chel says:
    22 November 2014

    Lisa, you lost 8lbs and nearly 3 inches in less than 30 days and you consider that a failure? By isagenix standards you are correct, they are below average, but for most programs, that would earn you job as a spokesperson! And re sugar, should we avoid fruit? Not all sugar is the bad kind. Best wishes to you in whatever you chose!

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