Jennifer McKinney Bankruptcy Round 2 and Round 3

Jennifer McKinney: Deadbeat

Yesterday my friends over at MckFacts informed me that our pal Jennifer McKinney was recently in bankruptcy court again. Back in 2012, Jennifer and her (soon-to-be ex-) husband Israel McKinney filed bankruptcy and eventually had it denied because of their attempted fraud on the court. The primary problems were a failure to disclose certain assets and income. Shocking!

Ten years later, Jennifer ran back to bankruptcy court in April 2022 to try to get some relief on the more than $1 million that she currently owes the IRS for taxes she never paid.  Here’s her petition for Chapter 13 protection, which is basically just a payment plan. The debts don’t get wiped out, but the creditors aren’t able to take your assets if you’re under a plan. (You can see lots of her bankruptcy documents here for free.)

I suspect this was done because the IRS is aggressively taking the money out of Jennifer’s bank account every time there is a deposit and is making moves to take the house and the cars. Yes, when you owe money to the IRS and refuse to pay, they can actual take possession of your assets to satisfy the debt. This is what happens when you owe them $1 million and just refuse to pay because you don’t think you should have to.

The details on Jennifer’s debts and income are in this document. The amount she owes in taxes is shocking. Let’s summarize some of the more interesting points! Here’s some of the stuff she says she owns:

  • The house on Innsbruck Rd, valued at $409,500
  • 4 cars: 2013 Land Rover, 2014 Land Rover, 2018 Lincoln Navigator,  2020 Jeep Wrangler
  • A 2019 Cherokee camper that she says is worth $35,000
  • $35,000 of jewelry

Everything is listed as “secured by IRS tax lien,” which is what tips us off that the IRS is probably going after her HARD.

What’s interesting is that she basically has NOTHING in the bank or in investment accounts (other than a couple of IRAs that she’s been funding). When you see how much money she made from Xyngular last year, you’ll scratch your head. Again, I suspect that the IRS has cleaned out her bank accounts (this is called garnishment). I also suspect that the IRS finally went straight to Xyngular with a levy that orders Xyngular to pay the IRS anything they owe to Jennifer. Yes, the IRS can make Xyngular give them all of Jennifer’s money, and this is a beautiful thing.

Let’s get to what Jennifer owes. It’s eye-watering.

  • $1,033,490 to the Internal Revenue Service – this is a secured claim because they’ve put a lien on assets
  • $307,092 to Marine Credit Union for the house
  • $234,100 to the IRS – this is an unsecured claim because it hasn’t gotten to the point where there is a lien yet
  • $133,000 to Gundersen Health (yep, she’s still stealing healthcare services from hospitals, despite make gobs of money from her pyramid scheme)
  • $28,815 to the IRS, also unsecured

Jennifer has admitted that she owes the IRS over $1.2 million, but of course she wants to play some games on how much time she should have to pay it. (She wants 10 years, the government says the right number is 5 years.)

And then Jennifer’s income and expenses. She reports making $32,480 per month from Xyngular. She then reports $16,656 in monthly expenses for the household, leaving $15,824 net income each month.

Let’s get into the income a little more. Jennifer reports $236,901 in commissions from 1/1/22 to 4/27/22.  This does not calculate out to the $32,480 per month that she reported. It’s more like $59,000 per month.

Her commissions for 2021 are reported to be $898,496. That’s almost $75,000 per month. Wow!

Have her commissions dropped? Or does she receive a bunch of her money later in the year, so the early months are lower but the later months are much higher?

Jennifer also reported state tax warrants in the year prior to this bankruptcy filing. It looks like about $163,000 was paid to Wisconsin for those, but it’s unclear because it seems some of the state tax warrants were duplicated on the form.

Our friend has given almost $32,000 to Global Hope Network for missionary work in the last 2 years.

Of course, Jennifer being Jennifer….. she didn’t follow the rules when she was going through the process of bankruptcy.  She was supposed to make monthly payments of $15,815 toward her debts while the bankruptcy was pending, but you can see in this document that she stopped paying.

Ultimately this bankruptcy filing was dismissed because Jennifer owed too much money to creditors and did not qualify for this type of filing.

What does that mean? The IRS can keep taking all the money that Xyngular would otherwise pay her until her taxes are paid. And this, my friends, is a beautiful thing.

So… on September 27, the Chapter 13 bankruptcy was re-filed. And of course there is an interesting bit. In the first case this year, Jennifer was required to pay $15k per month toward her debts. That money (over $38k) was held by the trustee, and the IRS wants to get their part of it, but Jennifer wants the money back.

The schedules that detail the assets, liabilities, and income haven’t been filed yet. I can’t wait to get my hands on them.

There’s a lot to these cases. I’ve just summarized what I’ve found to be most interesting. If you have any questions, ask them in the comments and I’ll do my best to answer them.

36 Comments

  1. SRWCF

    Hey, Tracy! Thank you so much for this amazing summary. I love how the IRS can go straight to the source and garnish her Xyngular wages. That’s so amazing! My question for you is can the IRS take ALL the money that Xyngular owes her, or do they have to leave Jennifer with some money for daily living expenses? Hopefully that amount would be what the IRS deems reasonable, not what Jennifer would come up with. Math is not her strong suit, after all!

    1. Tracy Coenen

      It takes a bit of doing, but that’s what happens to people who go YEARS without paying what they owe, all the while obviously having the means to pay.

      Great question about the money the IRS takes directly from Xyngular. If it was WAGES, there would be a certain amount that is exempt and can’t be taken, because the employee has to be able to live. But this isn’t wages. This a different kind of payment (thanks, self-employment!) and they can take it ALL. Mwuahahahahahahahahahaha!

  2. Elizabeth

    If the IRS has levied her payments from Xyng, how does she pay rent, food etc? It’s my understanding she is living in an apartment and not in the community property home.

    1. Tracy Coenen

      Well that’s the whole reason why she filed this bankruptcy, most likely. The bankruptcy filing stops them from being able to take the money, at least temporarily. And if the bankruptcy had been approved and she continued to make her $15k monthly payments to the IRS, they would no longer be able to take the money directly from Xyngular.

      So the answer is: Xyngular is almost certainly legally required to send ALL of her commission and bonus payments to the IRS instead of her. The only other way I see for Jennifer to get money is to sell products. Or to do some fancy footwork to have orders placed under other pyramid-toppers who then receive the commission and privately send it to Jennifer? I’m not sure the others would want to participate in a scheme like this, but who knows.

      Therefore, I really don’t know how she’s paying her bills. It certainly isn’t from commission checks from Xyngular. And it couldn’t happen to a nicer person, could it?

  3. Mary

    “Therefore, I really don’t know how she’s paying her bills. It certainly isn’t from commission checks from Xyngular. ”
    We don’t know that she is paying her bills. Certainly not her mortgage, probably not the rent on her bachelorette pad.

  4. Kristi

    That is why it was so important to get even the 15 year old to get a job. Need some money for gas and dresses for the Prom’s. It won’t cover the bills, but she isn’t used to paying those anything. But will probably keep the lights and internet on, food on the table, and gas in the tanks.

  5. puttheforkinme

    This is amazing Tracey, thank you. I hate to get my hopes up because we’ve seen her swindle her way out of these situations so many times. Do you feel the decision to approve this bankruptcy will include reference to the 2012 case where she was called out for fraudulent reporting? Do you feel she will once again find herself in hot water for the information she filled out in the first form, versus adding Israel and then refiling? Do you see pockets of inconsistency based the information she shared? Basically, do you think she’s up up the creekk without a paddle finally?

    1. Tracy Coenen

      puttheforkinme – Jennifer is not going to get out of paying these taxes. The only question is how long she will get to pay them. Regardless, she will pay interest on the balance as long as it remains unpaid. In other works, the IRS is going to get their $1.2 million out of her one way or another. As to the other stuff… I don’t necessarily think anything in the first filing was inaccurate or improper.

      She can probably get a Chapter 13 payment plan approved. And that’s all it is…. A PAYMENT PLAN. None of these debts go away. She basically gets time to pay them and stops the IRS from swiping her entire commission check every month. But she’ll be on the hook until every last debt is paid.

      And by the way, this is actually good for Gunderson. They’ll get paid too because of the filing.

  6. puttheforkinme

    Tracy – Thank you! You rock as always. One last question, if the Chapter 13 payment plan is approved, how many ‘missed payments’ are permitted before they can start seizing assets and garnishing again?

    1. Tracy Coenen

      puttheforkinme – That’s an excellent question. I don’t think there is a set number, but they generally act pretty quickly. In the first case, she literally missed ONE payment and the trustee moved to have the case dismissed. I think this trustee is going to be all over her until her debts are paid.

      This is so interesting! The first case was dismissed because her debts exceed the limits to qualify for Chapter 13. In order for this plan to get approved, she needs her debts to go down by a good amount. Which they may have if the IRS has resumed swiping her commission checks. And then at that point if she qualifies, she’d be under the payment plan for 5 years or so. (10 years if she has her way, LOL) But I’m not confident in her ability to actually make the month payments she’s supposed to!

      1. puttheforkinme

        Thanks – 100% agree she will NEVER stay on the plan! Even if it was $50 I think she has proven time and time again she just won’t pay bills. Even those small fines for her dog. She believes that she is above the law and she is pathologically adverse for paying for anything that doesn’t bring her immediate value.

  7. puttheforkinme

    OMG Tracy, you’re going to be sick of me. I know I said one last question above, but I must have lied, because i have another. When she claims that she gave ~$32,000 to Global Hope Network for missionary work in the last 2 years, do you think that includes her extravagant travel expenses for getting there? Flying first class, staying in hotels, dinners, etc? Also, IIRC, she posted requesting donations several times from her followers. Do we think she collected that money and is trying to push it off as money she personally donated? Inquiring minds want to know! One thing I know for damn sure is she didn’t write a check from her own bank account for 32K and flat out donate it to GHN.

    1. Tracy Coenen

      I don’t even know what to think of the donations. My first thought was that she pays Global Hope Network, who pays the tuition for “her kids” to go to school. I can’t imagine her paying for that schooling without getting SOME sort of benefit from it, such as a tax deduction.

      1. MollyT

        Well, if you’re not filing tax returns, you don’t really need any deductible expenses. In my experience, when you don’t file, the IRS calculates the amount of tax owed based on income and a standard deduction, possibly not even including other family members. They sure aren’t going to figure out how much mortgage interest she paid.

  8. Allison

    The dollar amount limits for filing chapter 13 increased this year in June to over $2.7 million. Too bad for Jenn that her first filing was in April. So she should be okay under the new, higher limits. But reliably making the monthly chapter 13 payments, while also paying this year’s taxes to the IRS, along with all her other monthly bills will likely be rather difficult for someone who has become accustomed to spending what she wants on whatever she wants.

    1. Tracy Coenen

      Good question. Probably not at this point. What she’s guilty of right now is “failure to pay.” You generally don’t get sent to prison for not paying. You can get sent there for big lies about how much you make.

  9. MMAH

    So many interesting tidbits in the fillings. She still owes (has a judgement against her) Patty Wisecup, the attorney in her FIRST bankruptcy filing from all those years ago. I also saw assorted medical bills from the ill-fated RV life trip, where she had to stay behind somewhere in the West while Israel took the kids home…that’s also very old debt. A question for Tracy: I see that she is the lone filer on this Bankruptcy, that Israel is not part of the case, though he is referenced as a co-debtor. What is the potential significance of that, especially in light of the ongoing divorce proceedings, filed about a month after the original bankruptcy filing included here. It’s also interesting to me that her address is listed here as the marital abode, but in the divorce paperwork, it’s listed as the apartment in town.

  10. MMAH

    Here’s another question about the bankruptcy and the divorce. If she were ordered to pay some kind of spousal support as part of the divorce decree, where would that fall in the hierarchy of owed payments? If, in fact, the IRS is garnishing all her income from Xyng, how can she continue to keep up with the house, the school tuition, etc., not to mention the prize she was offering and the trips all over the country? I do not know how any of this works, but even though I’m glad the IRS is going after what is theirs/ours, I’m also hoping that there’s some kind of monies allowed for supporting the kids.

    1. Tracy Coenen

      They won’t swipe all of her money to pay the IRS, so she’ll still be able to pay support to Izzy. That’s the whole reason for doing the bankruptcy…. to control what the IRS gets every month so she still has money left over for living expenses. She has plenty coming in to make these payments, so don’t worry about her.

      The trick in a bankruptcy like this is to show that you have enough money coming in to make the payments, but not let them know you actually have even more coming in, because they might make the monthly payments bigger.

  11. MMAH

    So, yesterday was divorce court day, where evidently they had to file financial disclosures (public record that it happened, not what the disclosures included). Would these bankruptcy/IRS documents be included in the family court filings? Again, I have no idea how these things work, but I am curious what kind of shenanigans she can try with the family court.

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